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WhatsApp Banned 2.4 Million Indian Accounts in July

More than half of the 2.39 million Indian accounts banned by WhatsApp in July were ‘proactively’ taken down before complaints were received, the company said in a report


WhatsApp banned 2.39 million accounts in July, the company said in a monthly report.
India's stricter IT laws now require large digital platforms to publish compliance reports every month. File photo by Reuters.

 

WhatsApp banned 2.39 million Indian accounts in July, the highest so far this year, according to the group’s monthly report, released late on Thursday.

The popular instant messaging app – owned by Meta, which also owns Facebook – said that of the accounts barred, 1.42 million were “proactively banned,” before any reports from users.

Several accounts were banned based on complaints received through the company’s grievances channel and the tools and resources it uses to detect such offenses, the social media platform said.

India’s stricter IT laws now require large digital platforms to publish compliance reports every month.

Draft rules circulated in June proposed setting up a panel to hear user appeals, and said that significant social media messaging platforms should allow identification of the first originator of information if directed by courts to do so.

In July, WhatsApp received a total of 574 grievance reports.

The messsaging platform, which has been criticised earlier for spreading fake news and hate speech in the country, as well as elsewhere in the world, took down 2.21 million accounts in India in June.

 

  • Reuters with additional editing by Jim Pollard

 

 

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Jim Pollard

Jim Pollard is an Australian journalist based in Thailand since 1999. He worked for News Ltd papers in Sydney, Perth, London and Melbourne before travelling through SE Asia in the late 90s. He was a senior editor at The Nation for 17+ years and has a family in Bangkok.

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