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Microsoft To Shut Down LinkedIn In China As Crackdowns Bite

The platform was the only major US-owned social network operating in the country, where Beijing demands they obey strict rules and regulations

LinkedIn says it will replace the Chinese service with a new portal called InJobs. Photo: Reuters

 

Microsoft is pulling the plug on LinkedIn in China nearly seven years after its launch and will replace it with a stripped-down version that will focus only on jobs. 

LinkedIn is the only major US-owned social network operating in the country, where the government requires platforms to follow strict rules and regulations.

“We’re also facing a significantly more challenging operating environment and greater compliance requirements in China,” LinkedIn said in a blog post on Thursday, adding it did not find the same level of success in the more social aspects of sharing and staying informed like it has globally.

 

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LinkedIn said it would replace the Chinese service, which restricts posting of certain content due to regulatory requirements, with a new portal called InJobs. 

The new service, which will be launched later this year, will not include a social feed or the ability to share posts or articles, it said.

California-based LinkedIn, which was bought by Microsoft in 2016, has become hugely popular globally with employers, employees and job seekers as its social media-like features make it easier for them to connect with one another, while building a professional network.

 

  • Reuters with additional editing by Sean O’Meara

 

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Sean OMeara

Sean O'Meara is an Editor at Asia Financial. He has been a newspaper man for more than 30 years, working at local, regional and national titles in the UK as a writer, sub-editor, page designer and print editor. A football, cricket and rugby fan, he has a particular interest in sports finance.

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