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TikTok App Could Control US Users’ Devices, FBI Chief Says

FBI director Christopher Wray told lawmakers in Washington on Tuesday the Chinese government could harness the video-sharing app to influence users or control their devices.


The US operations of Chinese-owned short-video platform TikTok raise national security concerns, according to FBI director Christopher Wray.
TikTok is trying to reach a deal with US officials on security concerns about TikTok's user data, but if Republicans win control of Congress any deal seen as soft on China could be scrapped. File photo: Reuters.

 

The US operations of Chinese-owned short-video platform TikTok raise national security concerns, according to the head of America’s top criminal investigations agency.

FBI director Christopher Wray told lawmakers in Washington on Tuesday the Chinese government could harness the video-sharing app to influence users or control their devices.

Risks include “the possibility that the Chinese government could use [TikTok] to control data collection on millions of users or control the recommendation algorithm, which could be used for influence operations,” Wray told the House Homeland Security Committee.

Beijing could also use the popular app, owned by ByteDance, to “control software on millions of devices,” giving it the opportunity to “technically compromise” those devices, he added.

 

The US government’s Committee on Foreign Investment in the United States (CFIUS), which reviews US acquisitions by foreign acquirers for potential national security risks, in 2020 ordered ByteDance to divest TikTok because of fears that US user data could be passed on to China’s communist government.

CFIUS and TikTok have been in talks for months aiming to reach a national security agreement to protect the data of TikTok’s more than 100 million users.

TikTok executive Vanessa Pappas told US Congress in September that TikTok was making “progress toward a final agreement with the US government to further safeguard US user data and fully address US national security interests.”

When asked about the FBI’s role in the CFIUS investigation, Wray said the agency’s foreign investment unit was part of the CFIUS process. “Our input would be taken into account in any agreements that might be made to address the issue,” he added.

Wray noted Chinese companies are required to essentially “do whatever the Chinese government wants them to in terms of sharing information or serving as a tool of the Chinese government. And so that’s plenty of reason by itself to be extremely concerned.”

A TikTok spokesperson said: “As Director Wray specified in his remarks, the FBI’s input is being considered as part of our ongoing negotiations with the US Government. While we can’t comment on the specifics of those confidential discussions, we are confident that we are on a path to fully satisfy all reasonable US national security concerns.”

Former President Donald Trump in 2020 attempted to block new users from downloading WeChat and TikTok and ban other transactions that would have effectively blocked the apps’ use in the United States but lost a series of court battles over the measure.

President Joe Biden in June 2021 withdrew a series of Trump executive orders that sought to ban new downloads of the apps and ordered the Commerce Department to conduct a review of security concerns posed by the apps.

Any security agreement with TikTok is expected to include data security requirements.

 

  • Reuters with additional editing by Jim Pollard

 

 

ALSO SEE:

 

TikTok Doubles Ad Revenue As Western Platforms Decline – NYT

 

US Lawmakers, TikTok Close in on Data Security Deal

 

YouTube to Give Creators More Cash in Bid to Match TikTok

 

 

Jim Pollard

Jim Pollard is an Australian journalist based in Thailand since 1999. He worked for News Ltd papers in Sydney, Perth, London and Melbourne before travelling through SE Asia in the late 90s. He was a senior editor at The Nation for 17+ years and has a family in Bangkok.

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