Energy

Indonesia, ADB, Owners to Shut Coal Power Station Early

 

Indonesia and the Asian Development Bank have agreed to a deal that will shut a large coal power plant in West Java seven years earlier than planned.

The deal with the owners of the Cirebon-1 coal-power plant was announced during the COP28 climate talks in Dubai on Sunday.

The ADB’s senior climate change energy specialist David Elzinga said the deal is the first under the ADB’s Energy Transition Mechanism (ETM) programme, which aims to help countries cut their climate-damaging carbon emissions.

The bank supports a $20-billion Just Energy Transition Partnership agreed on last year that aims to bring forward the sector’s peak emissions date to 2030, the ADB hopes to replicate it across other countries in the region.

 

ALSO SEE: COP28: Over 110 Nations Join Deal to Triple Renewable Energy

 

“If we don’t address these coal plants, we’re not going to meet our climate goals,” Elzinga said on the sidelines of the conference.

“By doing this pilot transaction, we are learning what it takes to make this happen,” he said. “We’re very much shaping this as something we want to take to other countries.”

ADB also has active ETM programmes in Kazakhstan, Pakistan, the Philippines, and Vietnam, and is considering transactions in two other countries, it said.

Under the non-binding framework deal, signed by ADB, Indonesian state-owned power utility company PT PLN, independent power producer PT Cirebon Electric Power (CEP) and the Indonesia Investment Authority (INA), a power purchase agreement for the 660 megawatt plant – a key supplier to the capital Jakarta – will be ended in December 2035 instead of a planned date of July 2042.

The plant, which is operated by CEP and only opened in 2012, could have been expected to run for 40 or more years, so retiring it in 2035 would avoid over 15 years of greenhouse gas emissions from the site, the ADB said.

The deal is subject to due diligence, including assessing its impact on the environment, the company’s workers and society more broadly, and the broader electricity system, but is expected to close in the first half of 2024.

 

  • Reuters with additional editing by Jim Pollard

 

ALSO SEE:

 

US Pledges $3 Billion for Green Climate Fund at COP28

 

Cities Lead COP28 Climate Change Push as Nations Fail to Deliver

 

China Seen Installing 230 GW of Solar & Wind Power in 2023 – PV

 

Summit Leader ‘Using COP28 to Promote Fossil Fuels’ – NYT

 

COP28: France, US to Seek Ban on Private Funds for Coal Plants

 

Jim Pollard

Jim Pollard is an Australian journalist based in Thailand since 1999. He worked for News Ltd papers in Sydney, Perth, London and Melbourne before travelling through SE Asia in the late 90s. He was a senior editor at The Nation for 17+ years.

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